Posted by: 2in10 | 04/02/2012

heal thy eating

I recently passed the main intersection in town where organizations place sandwich boards advertising events. I loved this one:

HEAL  THY  EATING

If it really says, HEALTHY EATING, does that make a difference?

Carolyn

PS: Sorry I have been gone for a while.

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Posted by: 2in10 | 03/04/2012

bully

I was struck by this comment in an Ask Amy advice column on Leap Day, February 29, 2012. The column ran in the Boston Herald.

Amy Dickinson is responding to an upset bride who wrote for advice about a long-time “friend” who assumed he would be invited to her overseas and expensive wedding. She can’t include him and was looking for some advice about how to inform this presumptuous person that the guest list was very limited and he would not make the cut.

“Do not let this person bully, persuade, or guilt you into an invitation.”

From my experience, this advice is applicable when one is dealing with cancer and to much of life. It’s easy when you are not feeling well, or are concerned about the suffering your family is experiencing because of your illness, or are eager to comply with the well-meaning requests of friends to go along with requests and recommendations.

A side benefit of having cancer is taking the opportunity to heed your own heart and not be, to use Amy’s words, “bullied, persuaded or ‘guilted'” into doing something that doesn’t feel right.

I am still working on that, and I trust you take all of my recommendations with a grain of salt (and a couple grains of pepper!).

Carolyn

Posted by: 2in10 | 03/04/2012

vitamin D3 — not D2

I’m being lazy again today, quoting something that I want to share with you. Here is the executive summary from the Dr. Mercola newsletter today. The article is titled, “If You Take Oral Vitamin D You MUST Avoid Making This Serious Mistake. I quote:

A meta-analysis of 50 trials looking at mortality rates for “doctor recommended” synthetic vitamin D supplements versus natural vitamin D3 shows a six percent risk reduction among those who used D3, compared to a two percent increased risk among those who used D2.

  • Research shows vitamin D3 is approximately 87 percent more potent in raising and maintaining vitamin D concentrations and produces 2- to 3-fold greater storage of vitamin D than does D2. D3 is also converted into its active form 500 percent faster.
  • Plant-based food sources that contain vitamin D provide vitamin D2. Only animal-based food sources, such as fish, egg yolk, and raw milk, contain D3.
  • Optimizing your vitamin D levels may be one of the most important steps you can take in support of your long-term health. The ideal way to do this is by exposing large amounts of skin to sunlight or a safe tanning bed, but if you need to use an oral supplement, make sure you’re taking vitamin D3.
  • The most important factor is your vitamin D serum level, which should ideally be between 50-70 ng/ml. When taking an oral vitamin D supplement, you should take enough to reach and maintain this therapeutic level. As a generic guideline, adults need to take about 8,000 IU’s a day to reach this level.

I am not a proponent of using a tanning bed, even a safe one, but I agree with the concept that getting some sun can be good for you.

It’s cloudy here today, deeply overcast, so we will have to find other ways to bring sunshine into our lives!

All best,

Carolyn

Posted by: 2in10 | 03/02/2012

arsenic in rice and rice products

I am quoting from the newsletter sent today from Debra’s Natural Gourmet in Concord, Mass. The article is by Adam Stark. Don’t panic about the subject, read it through. The simple solution is buy California-grown, organic rice. I share this because it is news to me, but not surprising, after all.

Recently, a study, “Arsenic, Organic Foods, and Brown Rice Syrup” was released online in a journal published by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The study sent shock waves that resulted in articles in every paper in the country. This is what Adam wrote in response.

“It has been acknowledged and understood for quite some time now that arsenic contamination is a near-universal issue in rice, much the same way mercury contamination is so common in fish.

“Of course we still eat fish. We just try and choose fish that’s as clean as it can be.

“The issue with rice is it’s a wet crop. It grows underwater. If the soil it’s grown in contains high levels of arsenic, that arsenic dissolves in the water, and then rice is very aggressive about absorbing it.

“However, not all rice is equal. A paper published in the April 1, 2007 issue of Environmental Science and Technology explored arsenic in 134 samples of rice purchased in retail stores in this country. The researchers tested brown rice and white rice, long grain and short grain, organic and conventionally grown, from both Louisiana and California. Not a single sample tested free of arsenic. However, the lowest level was found in a sample of organic brown rice from California; the highest level was found in a white, conventionally grown sample from Louisiana.

“Organic rice tended to be cleaner than conventionally grown rice. Brown rice tended to be cleaner than white. However, the biggest predictor of arsenic levels was where the rice came from: California rices averaged nearly half the arsenic levels of Louisiana rice (0.3 ppm vs. 0.17 ppm).

“Turns out, much of the land used to grow rice today was historically used to grow cotton. Since cotton isn’t a food, it’s exempt from many regulations which limit the use of toxic pesticides. The most common pesticide for cotton contains high levels of arsenic. This can linger in the soil for decades.

“What can you do to protect yourself?

* Don’t eat exclusively rice. Try buckwheat, millet, quinoa, amaranth, or teff instead.

* Minimize consumption of rice, and rice products during pregnancy and early childhood.

* Look for rice that is organically grown. Land has to be three years “clean” before crops can be considered organic. Three years isn’t much, but it’s a start. Look for well-established producers, who’ve been farming the land organically for longer.

* Look for rice from regions that do not have a long history of cotton production. California is a great start (so, Lundberg-brand rices). Also look to the exotic rices from Lotus foods, many of which come from areas where rice has been grown for centuries if not thousands of years. Some of our favorite rices from Lotus Foods are the Black Forbidden Rice, which was reserved for Chinese emperor and his family, and is said, today, to have more antioxidants than blueberries; the Jade Pearl Green Rice, wildcrafted and infused with bamboo (grown in CA); and Mekong Flower Rice, grown on small family plots by households belonging to the Damrei Romeal Organic Rice Cooperatives in Takeo, Cambodia where rice has been grown almost since time began.

* On the other hand, rice from Louisiana, Bangladesh, and regions of India is more likely problematic.

* Supplements derived from rice (rice protein powder, for example) tend to be safer, since supplements have to go through more rigorous lab testing than food.

* Buy organic as much as possible, meaning not just rice, meaning anything and everything. We can no longer kid ourselves and imagine that our organic agriculture is somehow segregated from the rest of how we treat the planet. You spray a pesticide, or dump a toxin into the soil, it’s going to end up in our food eventually.”

I get into the grocery store sometimes and think, “This organic brown rice is so expensive!” and then look for a brand that will save me some money. But when it’s rice, the additional cost isn’t so great, so I am going to pay attention to the source and when in a hurry, choose Lundberg.

I note Adam’s comment about cotton, but in our town we are wrestling with some old apple orchards that were formerly a farm and arboretum that our town has moved to acquire for conservation land. Soil testing revealed that arsenic used as was customary as a pesticide on apples remains in the soil, so the transfer of land to our Town is on hold and plans to preserve a lovely landscape are up in the air.

Carolyn

Posted by: 2in10 | 03/02/2012

arsenic in rice and rice products

I am quoting from the newsletter sent today from Debra’s Natural Gourmet in Concord, Mass. The article is by Adam Stark. Don’t panic about the subject, read it through. The simple solution is buy California-grown, organic rice. I share this because it is news to me, but not surprising, after all.

Recently, a study, “Arsenic, Organic Foods, and Brown Rice Syrup” was released online in a journal published by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The study sent shock waves that resulted in articles in every paper in the country. This is what Adam wrote in response.

“It has been acknowledged and understood for quite some time now that arsenic contamination is a near-universal issue in rice, much the same way mercury contamination is so common in fish.

“Of course we still eat fish. We just try and choose fish that’s as clean as it can be.

“The issue with rice is it’s a wet crop. It grows underwater. If the soil it’s grown in contains high levels of arsenic, that arsenic dissolves in the water, and then rice is very aggressive about absorbing it.

“However, not all rice is equal. A paper published in the April 1, 2007 issue of Environmental Science and Technology explored arsenic in 134 samples of rice purchased in retail stores in this country. The researchers tested brown rice and white rice, long grain and short grain, organic and conventionally grown, from both Louisiana and California. Not a single sample tested free of arsenic. However, the lowest level was found in a sample of organic brown rice from California; the highest level was found in a white, conventionally grown sample from Louisiana.

“Organic rice tended to be cleaner than conventionally grown rice. Brown rice tended to be cleaner than white. However, the biggest predictor of arsenic levels was where the rice came from: California rices averaged nearly half the arsenic levels of Louisiana rice (0.3 ppm vs. 0.17 ppm).

“Turns out, much of the land used to grow rice today was historically used to grow cotton. Since cotton isn’t a food, it’s exempt from many regulations which limit the use of toxic pesticides. The most common pesticide for cotton contains high levels of arsenic. This can linger in the soil for decades.

“What can you do to protect yourself?

* Don’t eat exclusively rice. Try buckwheat, millet, quinoa, amaranth, or teff instead.

* Minimize consumption of rice, and rice products during pregnancy and early childhood.

* Look for rice that is organically grown. Land has to be three years “clean” before crops can be considered organic. Three years isn’t much, but it’s a start. Look for well-established producers, who’ve been farming the land organically for longer.

* Look for rice from regions that do not have a long history of cotton production. California is a great start (so, Lundberg-brand rices). Also look to the exotic rices from Lotus foods, many of which come from areas where rice has been grown for centuries if not thousands of years. Some of our favorite rices from Lotus Foods are the Black Forbidden Rice, which was reserved for Chinese emperor and his family, and is said, today, to have more antioxidants than blueberries; the Jade Pearl Green Rice, wildcrafted and infused with bamboo (grown in CA); and Mekong Flower Rice, grown on small family plots by households belonging to the Damrei Romeal Organic Rice Cooperatives in Takeo, Cambodia where rice has been grown almost since time began.

* On the other hand, rice from Louisiana, Bangladesh, and regions of India is more likely problematic.

* Supplements derived from rice (rice protein powder, for example) tend to be safer, since supplements have to go through more rigorous lab testing than food.

* Buy organic as much as possible, meaning not just rice, meaning anything and everything. We can no longer kid ourselves and imagine that our organic agriculture is somehow segregated from the rest of how we treat the planet. You spray a pesticide, or dump a toxin into the soil, it’s going to end up in our food eventually.”

I get into the grocery store sometimes and think, “This organic brown rice is so expensive!” and then look for a brand that will save me some money. But when it’s rice, the additional cost isn’t so great, so I am going to pay attention to the source and when in a hurry, choose Lundberg.

I note Adam’s comment about cotton, but in our town we are wrestling with some old apple orchards that were formerly a farm and arboretum that our town has moved to acquire for conservation land. Soil testing revealed that arsenic used as a pesticide on apples remains in the soil, so the transfer of land to our Town is on hold and plans to preserve a lovely landscape are up in the air.

Carolyn

Posted by: 2in10 | 03/02/2012

arsenic in rice and rice products

I am quoting from the newsletter sent today from Debra’s Natural Gourmet in Concord, Mass. The article is by Adam Stark. Don’t panic about the subject, read it through. The simple solution is buy California-grown, organic rice. I share this because it is news to me, but not surprising, after all.

Recently, a study, “Arsenic, Organic Foods, and Brown Rice Syrup” was released online in a journal published by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The study sent shock waves that resulted in articles in every paper in the country. This is what Adam wrote in response.

“It has been acknowledged and understood for quite some time now that arsenic contamination is a near-universal issue in rice, much the same way mercury contamination is so common in fish.

“Of course we still eat fish. We just try and choose fish that’s as clean as it can be.

“The issue with rice is it’s a wet crop. It grows underwater. If the soil it’s grown in contains high levels of arsenic, that arsenic dissolves in the water, and then rice is very aggressive about absorbing it.

“However, not all rice is equal. A paper published in the April 1, 2007 issue of Environmental Science and Technology explored arsenic in 134 samples of rice purchased in retail stores in this country. The researchers tested brown rice and white rice, long grain and short grain, organic and conventionally grown, from both Louisiana and California. Not a single sample tested free of arsenic. However, the lowest level was found in a sample of organic brown rice from California; the highest level was found in a white, conventionally grown sample from Louisiana.

“Organic rice tended to be cleaner than conventionally grown rice. Brown rice tended to be cleaner than white. However, the biggest predictor of arsenic levels was where the rice came from: California rices averaged nearly half the arsenic levels of Louisiana rice (0.3 ppm vs. 0.17 ppm).

“Turns out, much of the land used to grow rice today was historically used to grow cotton. Since cotton isn’t a food, it’s exempt from many regulations which limit the use of toxic pesticides. The most common pesticide for cotton contains high levels of arsenic. This can linger in the soil for decades.

“What can you do to protect yourself?

* Don’t eat exclusively rice. Try buckwheat, millet, quinoa, amaranth, or teff instead.

* Minimize consumption of rice, and rice products during pregnancy and early childhood.

* Look for rice that is organically grown. Land has to be three years “clean” before crops can be considered organic. Three years isn’t much, but it’s a start. Look for well-established producers, who’ve been farming the land organically for longer.

* Look for rice from regions that do not have a long history of cotton production. California is a great start (so, Lundberg-brand rices). Also look to the exotic rices from Lotus foods, many of which come from areas where rice has been grown for centuries if not thousands of years. Some of our favorite rices from Lotus Foods are the Black Forbidden Rice, which was reserved for Chinese emperor and his family, and is said, today, to have more antioxidants than blueberries; the Jade Pearl Green Rice, wildcrafted and infused with bamboo (grown in CA); and Mekong Flower Rice, grown on small family plots by households belonging to the Damrei Romeal Organic Rice Cooperatives in Takeo, Cambodia where rice has been grown almost since time began.

* On the other hand, rice from Louisiana, Bangladesh, and regions of India is more likely problematic.

* Supplements derived from rice (rice protein powder, for example) tend to be safer, since supplements have to go through more rigorous lab testing than food.

* Buy organic as much as possible, meaning not just rice, meaning anything and everything. We can no longer kid ourselves and imagine that our organic agriculture is somehow segregated from the rest of how we treat the planet. You spray a pesticide, or dump a toxin into the soil, it’s going to end up in our food eventually.”

I get into the grocery store sometimes and think, “This organic brown rice is so expensive!” and then look for a brand that will save me some money. But when it’s rice, the additional cost isn’t so great, so I am going to pay attention to the source and when in a hurry, choose Lundberg.

I note Adam’s comment about cotton, but in our town we are wrestling with some old apple orchards that were bought for conservation land, but soil testing revealed that arsenic used as a pesticide on apples remains in the soil, so the transfer of land to our Town is on hold and plans to preserve a lovely landscape are up in the air.

Carolyn

Posted by: 2in10 | 03/02/2012

arsenic in rice and rice products

I am quoting from the newsletter sent today from Debra’s Natural Gourmet in Concord, Mass. The article is by Adam Stark. Don’t panic about the subject, read it through. The simple solution is buy California-grown, organic rice. I share this because it is news to me, but not surprising, after all.

Recently, a study, “Arsenic, Organic Foods, and Brown Rice Syrup” was released online in a journal published by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The study sent shock waves that resulted in articles in every paper in the country. This is what Adam wrote in response.

“It has been acknowledged and understood for quite some time now that arsenic contamination is a near-universal issue in rice, much the same way mercury contamination is so common in fish.

“Of course we still eat fish. We just try and choose fish that’s as clean as it can be.

“The issue with rice is it’s a wet crop. It grows underwater. If the soil it’s grown in contains high levels of arsenic, that arsenic dissolves in the water, and then rice is very aggressive about absorbing it.

“However, not all rice is equal. A paper published in the April 1, 2007 issue of Environmental Science and Technology explored arsenic in 134 samples of rice purchased in retail stores in this country. The researchers tested brown rice and white rice, long grain and short grain, organic and conventionally grown, from both Louisiana and California. Not a single sample tested free of arsenic. However, the lowest level was found in a sample of organic brown rice from California; the highest level was found in a white, conventionally grown sample from Louisiana.

“Organic rice tended to be cleaner than conventionally grown rice. Brown rice tended to be cleaner than white. However, the biggest predictor of arsenic levels was where the rice came from: California rices averaged nearly half the arsenic levels of Louisiana rice (0.3 ppm vs. 0.17 ppm).

“Turns out, much of the land used to grow rice today was historically used to grow cotton. Since cotton isn’t a food, it’s exempt from many regulations which limit the use of toxic pesticides. The most common pesticide for cotton contains high levels of arsenic. This can linger in the soil for decades.

“What can you do to protect yourself?

* Don’t eat exclusively rice. Try buckwheat, millet, quinoa, amaranth, or teff instead.

* Minimize consumption of rice, and rice products during pregnancy and early childhood.

* Look for rice that is organically grown. Land has to be three years “clean” before crops can be considered organic. Three years isn’t much, but it’s a start. Look for well-established producers, who’ve been farming the land organically for longer.

* Look for rice from regions that do not have a long history of cotton production. California is a great start (so, Lundberg-brand rices). Also look to the exotic rices from Lotus foods, many of which come from areas where rice has been grown for centuries if not thousands of years. Some of our favorite rices from Lotus Foods are the Black Forbidden Rice, which was reserved for Chinese emperor and his family, and is said, today, to have more antioxidants than blueberries; the Jade Pearl Green Rice, wildcrafted and infused with bamboo (grown in CA); and Mekong Flower Rice, grown on small family plots by households belonging to the Damrei Romeal Organic Rice Cooperatives in Takeo, Cambodia where rice has been grown almost since time began.

* On the other hand, rice from Louisiana, Bangladesh, and regions of India is more likely problematic.

* Supplements derived from rice (rice protein powder, for example) tend to be safer, since supplements have to go through more rigorous lab testing than food.

* Buy organic as much as possible, meaning not just rice, meaning anything and everything. We can no longer kid ourselves and imagine that our organic agriculture is somehow segregated from the rest of how we treat the planet. You spray a pesticide, or dump a toxin into the soil, it’s going to end up in our food eventually.”

I get into the grocery store sometimes and think, “This organic brown rice is so expensive!” and then look for a brand that will save me some money. But when it’s rice, the additional cost isn’t so great, so I am going to pay attention to the source and when in a hurry, choose Lundberg. In our town we are wrestling with some old apple orchards that were bought for conservation land, but soil testing revealed that arsenic used as a pesticide on apples remains in the soil, so the transfer of land to our Town is on hold and plans to preserve a lovely landscape are up in the air.

Carolyn

Posted by: 2in10 | 03/02/2012

arsenic in rice and rice products

I am quoting from the newsletter sent today from Debra’s Natural Gourmet in Concord, Mass. The article is by Adam Stark. Don’t panic about the subject, read it through. The simple solution is buy California-grown, organic rice. I share this because it is news to me, but not surprising, after all.

Recently, a study, “Arsenic, Organic Foods, and Brown Rice Syrup” was released online in a journal published by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The study sent shock waves that resulted in articles in every paper in the country. This is what Adam wrote in response.

“It has been acknowledged and understood for quite some time now that arsenic contamination is a near-universal issue in rice, much the same way mercury contamination is so common in fish.

“Of course we still eat fish. We just try and choose fish that’s as clean as it can be.

“The issue with rice is it’s a wet crop. It grows underwater. If the soil it’s grown in contains high levels of arsenic, that arsenic dissolves in the water, and then rice is very aggressive about absorbing it.

“However, not all rice is equal. A paper published in the April 1, 2007 issue of Environmental Science and Technology explored arsenic in 134 samples of rice purchased in retail stores in this country. The researchers tested brown rice and white rice, long grain and short grain, organic and conventionally grown, from both Louisiana and California. Not a single sample tested free of arsenic. However, the lowest level was found in a sample of organic brown rice from California; the highest level was found in a white, conventionally grown sample from Louisiana.

“Organic rice tended to be cleaner than conventionally grown rice. Brown rice tended to be cleaner than white. However, the biggest predictor of arsenic levels was where the rice came from: California rices averaged nearly half the arsenic levels of Louisiana rice (0.3 ppm vs. 0.17 ppm).

“Turns out, much of the land used to grow rice today was historically used to grow cotton. Since cotton isn’t a food, it’s exempt from many regulations which limit the use of toxic pesticides. The most common pesticide for cotton contains high levels of arsenic. This can linger in the soil for decades.

“What can you do to protect yourself?

* Don’t eat exclusively rice. Try buckwheat, millet, quinoa, amaranth, or teff instead.

* Minimize consumption of rice, and rice products during pregnancy and early childhood.

* Look for rice that is organically grown. Land has to be three years “clean” before crops can be considered organic. Three years isn’t much, but it’s a start. Look for well-established producers, who’ve been farming the land organically for longer.

* Look for rice from regions that do not have a long history of cotton production. California is a great start (so, Lundberg-brand rices). Also look to the exotic rices from Lotus foods, many of which come from areas where rice has been grown for centuries if not thousands of years. Some of our favorite rices from Lotus Foods are the Black Forbidden Rice, which was reserved for Chinese emperor and his family, and is said, today, to have more antioxidants than blueberries; the Jade Pearl Green Rice, wildcrafted and infused with bamboo (grown in CA); and Mekong Flower Rice, grown on small family plots by households belonging to the Damrei Romeal Organic Rice Cooperatives in Takeo, Cambodia where rice has been grown almost since time began.

* On the other hand, rice from Louisiana, Bangladesh, and regions of India is more likely problematic.

* Supplements derived from rice (rice protein powder, for example) tend to be safer, since supplements have to go through more rigorous lab testing than food.

* Buy organic as much as possible, meaning not just rice, meaning anything and everything. We can no longer kid ourselves and imagine that our organic agriculture is somehow segregated from the rest of how we treat the planet. You spray a pesticide, or dump a toxin into the soil, it’s going to end up in our food eventually.”

I get into the grocery store sometimes and think, “This organic brown rice is so expensive!” and then look for a brand that will save me some money. But when it’s rice, the additional cost isn’t so great, so I am going to pay attention to the source and when in a hurry, choose Lundberg. In our town we are wrestling with some old apple orchards that were bought for conservation land, but soil testing revealed that arsenic used as a pesticide on apples remains in the soil, so the transfer of land to our Town is on hold and plans to preserve a lovely landscape are up in the air.

Carolyn

Posted by: 2in10 | 03/02/2012

arsenic in rice and rice products

I am quoting from the newsletter sent today from Debra’s Natural Gourmet in Concord, Mass. The article is by Adam Stark. Don’t panic about the subject, read it through. The simple solution is buy California organic rice.

Recently, a study, “Arsenic, Organic Foods, and Brown Rice Syrup” was released online in a journal published by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The study sent shock waves that resulted in articles in every paper in the country. This is what Adam wrote in response.

“It has been acknowledged and understood for quite some time now that arsenic contamination is a near-universal issue in rice, much the same way mercury contamination is a so common in fish.

“Of course we still eat fish. We just try and choose fish that’s as clean as it can be.

“The issue with rice is it’s a wet crop. It grows underwater. If the soil it’s grown in contains high levels of arsenic, that arsenic dissolves in the water, and then rice is very aggressive about absorbing it.

“However, not all rice is equal. A paper published in the April 1, 2007 issue of Environmental Science and Technology explored arsenic in 134 samples of rice purchased in retail stores in this country. The researchers tested brown rice and white rice, long grain and short grain, organic and conventionally grown, from both Louisiana and California. Not a single sample tested free of arsenic. However, the lowest level was found in a sample of organic brown rice from California; the highest level was found in a white, conventionally grown sample from Louisiana.

“Organic rice tended to be cleaner than conventionally grown rice. Brown rice tended to be cleaner than white. However, the biggest predictor of arsenic levels was where the rice came from: California rices averaged nearly half the arsenic levels of Louisiana rice (0.3 ppm vs. 0.17 ppm).

“Turns out, much of the land used to grow rice today was historically used to grow cotton. Since cotton isn’t a food, it’s exempt from many regulations which limit the use of toxic pesticides. The most common pesticide for cotton contains high levels of arsenic. This can linger in the soil for decades.

“What can you do to protect yourself?

* Don’t eat exclusively rice. Try buckwheat, millet, quinoa, amaranth, or teff instead.

* Minimize consumption of rice, and rice products during pregnancy and early childhood.

* Look for rice that is organically grown. Land has to be three years “clean” before crops can be considered organic. Three years isn’t much, but it’s a start. Look for well-established producers, who’ve been farming the land organically for longer.

* Look for rice from regions that do not have a long history of cotton production. California is a great start (so, Lundberg-brand rices). Also look to the exotic rices from Lotus foods, many of which come from areas where rice has been grown for centuries if not thousands of years. Some of our favorite rices from Lotus Foods are the Black Forbidden Rice, which was reserved for Chinese emperor and his family, and is said, today, to have more antioxidants than blueberries; the Jade Pearl Green Rice, wildcrafted and infused with bamboo (grown in CA); and Mekong Flower Rice, grown on small family plots by households belonging to the Damrei Romeal Organic Rice Cooperatives in Takeo, Cambodia where rice has been grown almost since time began.

* On the other hand, rice from Louisiana, Bangladesh, and regions of India is more likely problematic.

* Supplements derived from rice (rice protein powder, for example) tend to be safer, since supplements have to go through more rigorous lab testing than food.

* Buy organic as much as possible, meaning not just rice, meaning anything and everything. We can no longer kid ourselves and imagine that our organic agriculture is somehow segregated from the rest of how we treat the planet. You spray a pesticide, or dump a toxin into the soil, it’s going to end up in our food eventually.”

I get into the grocery store sometimes and think, “This organic brown rice is so expensive!” and then look for a brand that will save me some money. But when it’s rice, the additional cost isn’t so great, so I am going to pay attention to the source and when in a hurry, choose Lundberg. In our town we are wrestling with some old apple orchards that were bought for conservation land, but soil testing revealed that arsenic used as a pesticide on apples remains in the soil, so the transfer of land to our Town is on hold and plans to preserve a lovely landscape are up in the air.

Carolyn

Posted by: 2in10 | 03/02/2012

arsenic in rice and rice products

I am quoting from the newsletter sent today from Debra’s Natural Gourmet in Concord, Mass. The article is by Adam Stark. Don’t panic about the subject, read it through. The simple solution is buy California organic rice.

Recently, a study, “Arsenic, Organic Foods, and Brown Rice Syrup” was released online in a journal published by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The study sent shock waves that resulted in articles in every paper in the country. This is what Adam wrote in response.

“It has been acknowledged and understood for quite some time now that arsenic contamination is a near-universal issue in rice, much the same way mercury contamination is a so common in fish.

“Of course we still eat fish. We just try and choose fish that’s as clean as it can be.

“The issue with rice is it’s a wet crop. It grows underwater. If the soil it’s grown in contains high levels of arsenic, that arsenic dissolves in the water, and then rice is very aggressive about absorbing it.

“However, not all rice is equal. A paper published in the April 1, 2007 issue of Environmental Science and Technology explored arsenic in 134 samples of rice purchased in retail stores in this country. The researchers tested brown rice and white rice, long grain and short grain, organic and conventionally grown, from both Louisiana and California. Not a single sample tested free of arsenic. However, the lowest level was found in a sample of organic brown rice from California; the highest level was found in a white, conventionally grown sample from Louisiana.

“Organic rice tended to be cleaner than conventionally grown rice. Brown rice tended to be cleaner than white. However, the biggest predictor of arsenic levels was where the rice came from: California rices averaged nearly half the arsenic levels of Louisiana rice (0.3 ppm vs. 0.17 ppm).

“Turns out, much of the land used to grow rice today was historically used to grow cotton. Since cotton isn’t a food, it’s exempt from many regulations which limit the use of toxic pesticides. The most common pesticide for cotton contains high levels of arsenic. This can linger in the soil for decades.

“What can you do to protect yourself?

* Don’t eat exclusively rice. Try buckwheat, millet, quinoa, amaranth, or teff instead.

* Minimize consumption of rice, and rice products during pregnancy and early childhood.

* Look for rice that is organically grown. Land has to be three years “clean” before crops can be considered organic. Three years isn’t much, but it’s a start. Look for well-established producers, who’ve been farming the land organically for longer.

* Look for rice from regions that do not have a long history of cotton production. California is a great start (so, Lundberg-brand rices). Also look to the exotic rices from Lotus foods, many of which come from areas where rice has been grown for centuries if not thousands of years. Some of our favorite rices from Lotus Foods are the Black Forbidden Rice, which was reserved for Chinese emperor and his family, and is said, today, to have more antioxidants than blueberries; the Jade Pearl Green Rice, wildcrafted and infused with bamboo (grown in CA); and Mekong Flower Rice, grown on small family plots by households belonging to the Damrei Romeal Organic Rice Cooperatives in Takeo, Cambodia where rice has been grown almost since time began.

* On the other hand, rice from Louisiana, Bangladesh, and regions of India is more likely problematic.

* Supplements derived from rice (rice protein powder, for example) tend to be safer, since supplements have to go through more rigorous lab testing than food.

* Buy organic as much as possible, meaning not just rice, meaning anything and everything. We can no longer kid ourselves and imagine that our organic agriculture is somehow segregated from the rest of how we treat the planet. You spray a pesticide, or dump a toxin into the soil, it’s going to end up in our food eventually.”

I get into the grocery store sometimes and think, “This organic brown rice is so expensive!” and then look for a brand that will save me some money. But when it’s rice, the additional cost isn’t so great, so I am going to pay attention to the source and when in a hurry, choose Lundberg. In our town we are wrestling with some old apple orchards that were bought for conservation land, but soil testing revealed that arsenic used as a pesticide on apples remains in the soil,

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